Archive for October, 2011

Alternate Side Suspended

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Today I jolted out of bed panicked, for the first time ever I forgot about my car and alternate side parking!  I dashed down three flights of stairs with bed-head hair and pajamas, my car keys in my clutched fist.  I ran outside bewildered and ran to my car anxiously trying to unlock the club before I got a ticket, no orange piece of paper yet decorating my windshield.  An old man standing by the car in front of me graciously offered to move his car up so that I may get out easily.

This is when it dawned on me that while I was in my rushed state of panic I hadn’t noticed that the block was full of cars.  No one was frantically running to pull out and grab the open spot across the other side.  No one else was worried that it was a whole half hour past the alternate side time plastered on that little red and white sign.  Of course, being a skeptical New Yorker, I walked down to a man four cars ahead of me and asked him if alternate side was suspended.  He said yes, it was a Jewish holiday, today and yesterday.  I thanked him and walked calmly back to my car to put the club back on my steering wheel.  I was relieved and then I had no choice but to laugh at myself, bed head and all.

I think it is time I print out this, the alternate side suspension calendar! http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/motorist/scrintro.shtml#calendar2011

The Peach Trees

Monday, October 10th, 2011

When I was eleven years old, my Aunt had a pool in her backyard in Sheepshead Bay.  It was about four feet tall.  My cousins and I would play Marco Polo for hours, “Marco!” and “Polo!” rang through the summer air.  We ran around the edges of the pool, faster and faster, until we created a whirlpool.  We had handstand contests as we inhaled the stinging chlorine; the undeniable scent of the summer sun permeated the air.  We refused to leave the pool until our fingers and toes had shriveled up so tightly that we felt them in the water.

Sometimes the older boy cousins, rambunctious and full of mischief, would jump from the edge of the pool into the water.  The flimsy pool wall bent in utter misery, under the weight of their feet.  They would laugh as they pushed our heads under the water, letting us go only when we flailed our arms desperately as the water began to enter our mouths and nostrils. We bobbed up, concerned more about choking then those boys, coughing the excess water which burned our throats and reddened our faces with stinging chlorine.

At some point, we would exit the pool, land on our bare feet upon the uncaring concrete ground, water dripping off our bodies in a fierce competition with the warm sun.  Along the yellow-sided house were peach trees.  We would run to pull a soft, round, furry peach off the branch.  The peach was warm and we cupped both it in both hands careful not to squish its fragile body.  Then we bit into the peach’s sweet flesh and smiled as the juice ran down our chins all the way to our neck.